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Frequently Asked Questions

How do I organize a neighborhood association?

How do I find out about neighborhood block parties?

How can I start a neighborhood watch group?

Does the City enforce homeowner covenants or deed restrictions?

How can I find out the address and size of a piece of property? How can our neighborhood organize a neighborhood clean up?

How do I get trash and junk removed from my neighbor's property?

What is code enforcement?

What do I do if I receive a code "notice of violation?"

Can I operate a business from my home? Whom do I call if animals are running loose in the neighborhood?

Who sprays our neighborhood for mosquitoes?

I have a rat problem! What do I do?

What can our neighborhood do about graffiti?


How do I organize a neighborhood association?
The first step in organizing a neighborhood association is checking for existing neighborhood associations in and around your area. To find out the names and contact persons of existing associations, contact your Neighborhood Liaison at (918) 596-1292 or by email at: neighborhood@cityoftulsa.org

Your Neighborhood Liaison can also help:

  • Provide an informational kit on how to get started
  • Become your link with the Mayor's staff to work on neighborhood issues
  • Keep updated records of association officers and contacts. Contact this office for changes in your organization

Also, the neighborhood registry provides agenda information for the Board of Adjustment and the Tulsa Metropolitan Area Planning Commission (TMAPC), which involves hearings on zoning and land-use changes throughout our city.

How do I find out about neighborhood block parties?
There is no better way of getting together and meeting your neighbors than having a block party. Neighborhoods are better and safer places to live when there is a sense of caring in the community. This closeness can develop at a neighborhood block party.

Block parties have varied from a simple gathering of a few folks in a front yard sharing memories and beverages to elaborate, highly organized events involving dozens of streets in a neighborhood. When planning, do not overlook all of the resources in your area. Property owners, business owners and residents may all have an interest in block party plans because they all benefit from living and working in a healthy neighborhood.

Contact your neighborhood liaison at (918) 596-1292 for registration information, barricades and a booklet of helpful hints for your next block party.

How can I start a neighborhood watch group?
Participation in an ALERT NEIGHBORS Program can help reduce crime in your area. The Crime Prevention Network, along with a representative from the Tulsa Police Department, can meet with your neighborhood and provide information on personal safety and property crime.

The Crime Prevention Network coordinates the ALERT NEIGHBORS Program, as well as the Citizens Alert Patrol (CAP) Program in Tulsa neighborhoods. For information, contact the Crime Prevention Network at (918) 585-5209 or by email at: info@okcpn.org

Does the City enforce homeowner covenants or deed restrictions?
The City of Tulsa, as with almost all other local governments, has no power to enforce restrictive covenants. Restrictive covenants, also known as covenants, homeowner covenants or deed restrictions, are private land-use controls included as part of the property title.

A covenant restricts the property use and is enforceable usually by other property owners in the same subdivision who have similar restrictions on their property. If you have questions concerning restrictive covenants, contact your homeowner association officers or a real estate attorney.

How can I find out the address and size of a piece of property?
Address information and property dimensions for property located within the city limits or within Tulsa County can be obtained through the Tulsa County Courthouse's Land Office at (918) 596-5000. You will need to provide the legal description of the property.

How can our neighborhood organize a neighborhood clean up?
Neighborhoods can contact a neighborhood Liaison at (918) 596-1292 or neighborhood@cityoftulsa.org for assistance in organizing a neighborhood clean up. The City of Tulsa will provide residents with trash bags and will make arrangements for pick-up of the trash. Free dumpsters, a tree debris/greenwaste site and free landfill days twice each year also are designed for helping keep neighborhoods clean.

How do I get trash and junk removed from my neighbor's property?
Trash, junk and debris cannot be left in the yard and must be disposed of properly. This includes junk such as auto parts, appliances, furniture, building materials and tires. Call the Customer Care Center at 311 with an exact address of the violation.

What is code enforcement?
Neighborhood Investigations is part of the Working in Neighborhoods Department. This office handles the enforcement of the City of Tulsa's ordinances regulating nuisance and zoning violations. Clean neighborhoods can lead to safer neighborhoods.

  • The goal of Neighborhood Investigations is to promote and encourage voluntary compliance with city codes to assure citizens the quality of life they desire in neighborhoods. Individual structures and neighborhoods that are not maintained cost citizens money. Studies indicate that trash in a neighborhood can reduce area property values by 14.5 percent.

  • The most common violations cited are high weeds and grass; failure to clean up trash, junk and debris; illegal parking of inoperable motor vehicles, and unsecured properties. Violations should be reported by calling the Customer Care Center at 311. Callers must provide the exact address of the violation.

What do I do if I receive a code "notice of violation?"
Find out how to correct the problem and do so promptly. Prompt action to correct the problem will benefit your neighborhood, as well as help you avoid fines and possible liens on your property.

City inspectors are available to work with you. Stay in touch with the inspector assigned to your case to keep him informed about your scheduled clean up. Assistance is available for trash removal where possible. For more information, use the phone contact on the "notice of violation" or call the Customer Care Center at 311.

Can I operate a business from my home?
Residents of the city of Tulsa are permitted to operate some businesses from their home as an accessory use. This means the primary use of the building must be residential.

Home occupations that are permitted by right without special exception are listed in City of Tulsa Ordinances, Title 42. We encourage you to check with INCOG staff before proceeding with business plans for your home. Some home occupations which are not permitted by right may be permitted as a special exception subject to certain requirements. For questions regarding home businesses and special exceptions, call the Board of Adjustment, which can be reached through INCOG at (918) 584-7526.

If you have questions about, or want to report violations about businesses in homes in your neighborhood, call the Customer Care Center at 311.

Whom do I call if animals are running loose in the neighborhood?
Call Tulsa Animal Welfare at (918) 596-8000. They handle complaints regarding loose animals, animal bites or vaccinations and will pick up stray or injured animals. The shelter provides information on pet license fees, spay and neutering programs, as well as dog and cat adoptions.

The City of Tulsa has a current animal ordinance and requires adherence to the leash law. The shelter staff will help you work with neighbors on "pet" problems. Please refer to Tulsa Animal Welfare for more information.

Who sprays our neighborhood for mosquitoes?
The Tulsa Health Department coordinates a Vector Program. which includes spraying for areas heavily saturated with mosquitoes. The Health Department also provides tips for reducing the problems yard-by-yard. Tips can be found on their www.tulsa-health.org.

I have a rat problem! What do I do?
Finding and identifying a rodent problem is a relatively clear process. Rat sightings and rat burrows are evident signs that rats exist. Burrows leave a moundless opening in the ground about 2-3 inches in diameter. Rats like to burrow under woodpiles, doghouses, and along the edges of sidewalks, houses and concrete. Rats need a lot of water and generally burrow close to a water source.

Humans supply the three basic needs of rats and mice:

Food - Taking away the rodent's food supply is vital. Using a refuse container that is watertight, rust resistant and easy to clean, and which has a recessed bottom is important. Make certain that dog food and birdseed are stored in rodent-proof containers. Dog food bowls and bird feeders are often the rodent's favorite dining establishment. Picking up pet waste also is an important measure toward eliminating food for rodents.Water - Eliminating outdoor water sources is an essential step toward controlling rodent populations. Fixing leaking pipes and dripping air conditioners is a must. In addition, fill in areas where water collects and stands. Pool water is another perfect water source for rodents. Covering your pool is also essential.Shelter - Close openings around pipes, doors, windows and other possible places of entry with sheet metal, hardware cloth, or steel wool. Plugging drain holes in dumpsters also will help. Removing lumber, rocks and debris from yards also can take away the rodents' harborage areas.

Removing easy access to food, water and shelter, combined with trapping and poisoning, will reduce a rodent population significantly. For information on rat poisons and trapping, contact the Tulsa City-County Health Department - Rat Control at (918) 595-4200, or: www.tulsa-health.org

What can our neighborhood do about graffiti?
Studies have shown that if graffiti is removed quickly from tagged property, there is less chance it will recur. The City of Tulsa has a graffiti elimination program that works to remove graffiti from public or private property including buildings, signs, and utility boxes. Graffiti should be reported immediately to the Customer Care Center at 311 because:

  • Graffiti leads to the overall decline of a neighborhood
  • Graffiti is not only a malicious destruction of property, but also can lead to violence and crime
  • Graffiti should not be taken lightly and should be removed immediately