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Genealogy Process

Updated: July 12, 2024

Key Findings: Of the 35 exhumed burials from the previous three excavations, eight have produced genetic genealogy profiles. Those profiles are below, most of which include surnames and locations of interest.  Individuals may recognize those surnames in their family trees.

A detailed list of the burials associated with these surnames and locations can be found below:

Using DNA sequencing, the process by which genetic information of a DNA sample is obtained from remains, Intermountain Forensics, the laboratory assisting the City with DNA analysis for the Investigation, is helping create genetic genealogy profiles.

Each of those profiles are uploaded into GEDmatch and FamilyTreeDNA, two authorized databases that allow comparisons to unidentified remains. Individuals who have voluntarily shared their DNA tests with GEDmatch and/or Family Tree DNA, whether as part of this investigation or otherwise, will have these genetic genealogy profiles (and others that are produced from this investigation) compared to their own.

  • New Surnames/Locations of Interest:
    • Hightower, Mason, Brittman, and Marshall surnames from Shelby County, TN, Grenada County, MS, and Marshall County, MS, 1880-1920.
    • Mathews surname from Tennessee, 1880-1920.

  • Existing Surnames/Locations of Interest:
    • Jones and Medler surnames of Clay County, Mississippi, 1880-1900.

  • About the burial:
    • A female was exhumed in 2021, and additional DNA was collected in a 2022 exhumation. The burial was found in a matching casket to Burial 13 with an “At Rest” plaque. No apparent gunshot wound or trauma was present.

If you believe you have any of these surnames in your family tree that align with the locations mentioned, please reach out to the Intermountain Forensics team at www.tulsa1921dna.org

C. L. Daniel is the first Tulsa Race Massacre victim to be identified from the City's 1921 Graves Investigation.


Below is a brief biography, as written by the genealogists at Intermountain Forensics:

C. L. Daniel, born on July 14, 1896, in Newnan, Coweta, to Thomas and Amanda Meriwether Daniel, passed away tragically in 1921. He was one of seven sons born to Thomas and Amanda. C.L.'s brothers were Smith Daniel, Eddie Daniel, Stacy Daniel, Roy Daniel, Rufus Daniel, and John Daniel. Sadly, C. L. was preceded in death by two of his brothers, with his younger brother John dying in childhood in 1910.

After the early death of their father, the Daniel family faced significant challenges. Their mother, Amanda, became a widow by 1910 and worked tirelessly to provide for her sons. Despite the hardships, the Daniel family together persevered, and records show that by 1920, Amanda proudly owned their home, a testament to their hard work and resilience.

C. L. Daniel served his country during World War I. He was stationed at Camp Gordon, Georgia, where he served in the 47th Company, 12th Training Battalion, and the 406th Rescue Labor Battalion, Company B, as an Army Private. During his service there, he sustained injuries and spent 19 days in the Base Hospital at Camp Gordon. Despite these challenges, C.L. was honorably discharged, having served with dedication for nine months and sixteen days.

After his discharge, C.L. embarked on a journey across the United States, displaying an adventurous spirit and a longing to explore the country. In a heartfelt letter to the Army requesting veteran benefits, he expressed his commitment to the war effort and his ongoing struggle with the injuries he
sustained. He sought assistance to secure employment and sustenance, hoping to return home to his beloved mother in Georgia.

Tragically, C.L.'s journey home was cut short. Sometime after February 1921, while enroute to Georgia from Ogden, Utah, he stopped in Tulsa, Oklahoma. It was there that he became a victim of the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre, a tragic and shameful chapter in American history. Correspondence from his mother, Congressman Albert Sidney Camp, the Army and others in the years following confirm that C.L. was among those killed during the massacre.

C.L. Daniel was a young man of immense courage and dedication, who served his country honorably and loved his family deeply. His adventurous spirit and determination to overcome adversity will always be remembered. He leaves behind a legacy of resilience and bravery, forever etched in the hearts of those who knew and loved him.

  • Updated Surnames/Locations of Interest:
    • Thompson surnames of Sealy, Texas, and Austin County, Texas, and nearby Colorado County, Texas.
    • Meadors, Meadows, Johnson, Ballard, Core, Wright, and Buchanan surnames of the Alabama counties of Tallapoosa, Lee, Macon, Elmore, and Coosa.
    • Lovejoy, Birmingham, and Zeigler surnames of Alabama counties of Elmore and Jefferson and of Oklahoma during the Indian Territory designation, specifically Chickasaw by 1900 and Blaine County, Oklahoma by 1911.
    • Carter and Strong surnames (related to the Lovejoy family) of Oklahoma during Indian Territory designation, specifically Chickasaw by 1900.
    • Bremby surnames (also spelled Bembry, Brembry, Brimbry, etc.) of Sealy County and Austin County, Texas, and nearby Colorado County, Texas.
    • Some members of the Bremby family from Texas briefly visited Tulsa, so the genealogy team is looking to connect with Oklahomans who may have variations of that surname.

  • Removed Surnames/Locations of Interest:
    • Maggett surname of Mississippi.
    • Strong and McGee surnames of Union Parish, Louisiana, and Texas.
    • Still surname of Oklahoma during Indian Territory designation.

  • About the burial:
    • A female was exhumed in 2021, and additional DNA was collected in a 2022 exhumation. The burial was found in a matching casket to Burial 1 with an “At Rest” plaque found. No apparent gunshot wound or trauma was present.

If you believe you have any of these family surnames in your family tree that aligns with the locations mentioned, please reach out to the Intermountain Forensics team at www.tulsa1921dna.org

  • New Surnames/Locations of Interest:
    • Genealogists have added locations of interest to the Holden surname, namely Natchitoches Parish in Louisiana from 1870-1920 and the Sabine Parish in Louisiana until 1910.
    • Additionally, the Luckett surname of Rapides Parish, Louisiana, St. Charles County, Missouri, and Loudoun County, Virginia, have also been added.

  • Existing Surnames/Locations of Interest:
    • Holden surname of Sabine Parish, Louisiana, and the Luckett surname of Rapides Parish, Louisiana.

  • Removed Surnames/Locations of Interest:
    • Larrimore surname of Sabine Parish, Louisiana.
    • Mayre surname of Rapides Parish, Louisiana.

  • About the burial:
    • A male was exhumed in 2021, and additional DNA was gathered in a 2022 exhumation. The burial took place in a plain wooden casket, and no apparent gunshot wound or trauma was present.

If you believe you have any of these family surnames in your family tree that aligns with the locations mentioned, please reach out to the Intermountain Forensics team at www.tulsa1921dna.org

  • New Surnames/Locations of Interest:
    • Claiborne Parish, Louisiana, has been added as a potential location of interest to the Traylor and Taylor surnames.
    • Brown and Mack in Georgia and Louisiana late 1800s to present
      • Descendants went to:
        • Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Arizona and Los Angeles by 1930s
  • Existing Surnames/Locations of Interest:
    • Traylor surname of Louisiana and Bowie County, Texas.

  • Removed Surnames/Locations of Interest:
    • Rentie, Kernal, Grayson, Island, and Smith families who were Muscogee (Creek) Freedmen in the 1800s.
    • The Davis family of Kaufman, Texas, and Okmulgee, Oklahoma, from the early 1900s.
    • The genealogy team would like to express their gratitude to the community for the reference testers who allowed them to remove the previous surnames.

  • About the burial:
    • A male from the 2021 exhumation. The burial was in a plain wooden casket, and no apparent gunshot wound or trauma was present.

If you believe you have any of these family surnames in your family tree that aligns with the locations mentioned, please reach out to the Intermountain Forensics team at www.tulsa1921dna.org

  • New Surnames/Locations of Interest:
    • Black, Thompson, Parks, Kerns, Fletcher, Hinson, and Dixon surnames of Cabarrus County, North Carolina, specifically near the communities of Huntersville, Long Creek, and Deweese, North Carolina, from 1870-1920.
    • Crawford and Watt(s) surnames of Taylorsville, North Carolina, and Alexander County, North Carolina in the 1870s.

  • Existing Surnames/Locations of Interest:
    • Alexander surname of Mecklenburg County, North Carolina.

  • About the burial:
    • A male from 2022 exhumation. The burial was in a plain wooden casket and no apparent gunshot wound or trauma was present.

If you believe you have any of these family surnames in your family tree that aligns with the locations mentioned, please reach out to the Intermountain Forensics team at www.tulsa1921dna.org

Burial 45 – Second Excavation

  • Surnames/Locations of Interest:
    • Suggs surname of Edgecombe County, North Carolina.
    • Hamilton, Brooks, and Thomas surname of Eufaula, (Brooks County) Alabama.

  • About the Burial:
    • Adult male buried in a simple wooden casket. He was exhumed and DNA was collected in 2022. No evidence of trauma was observed during the forensic analysis.

If you believe you have any of these family surnames in your family tree that aligns with the locations mentioned, please reach out to the Intermountain Forensics team at www.tulsa1921dna.org

Burial 119Third Excavation

  • Surnames/Locations of Interest:
    • TBD – Genealogists are working to identify more information from potential DNA relatives before being able to release surnames and locations of interest for this burial.

  • About the Burial:
    • Adult female buried in a simple wooden casket who was exhumed in 2023. Evidence of trauma was not observed during the forensic analysis.  

Intermountain Forensics is seeking help from anyone who may be associated with the above surnames or have relatives from the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre. If your family tree has the surnames in the location of interest for any of the unknown burials, please contact the genealogy team at Intermountain Forensics. Information can be submitted online by clicking the "Provide Information" button at www.tulsa1921dna.org. You can also find instructions for participating with DNA in this project at the same website. You can also email the genealogy team directly at idteam@tulsa1921dna.org.